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explore-blog:

Trailer for the film about legendary political theorist Hannah Arendt. 

Why you should care.

(via Progressive Geographies

(Source: explore-blog)

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tetw:

Must-read articles by one of the best journalists in the game

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kateoplis:

“It is so important for information and ideas to flow freely over the Internet and through the media, because that’s how we discover the truth, that’s how we learn what’s really happening in our communities, in our country and our world.
That’s how we decide which values and ideas we think are best — by questioning and debating them vigorously, by listening to all sides of the argument and by judging for ourselves. And believe me, I know how this can be a messy and frustrating process. My husband and I are on the receiving end of plenty of questioning and criticism from our media and our fellow citizens, and it’s not always easy, but we wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world. Because time and again, we have seen that countries are stronger and more prosperous when the voices and opinions of all citizens can be heard.”
FLOTUS in China

kateoplis:

“It is so important for information and ideas to flow freely over the Internet and through the media, because that’s how we discover the truth, that’s how we learn what’s really happening in our communities, in our country and our world.

That’s how we decide which values and ideas we think are best — by questioning and debating them vigorously, by listening to all sides of the argument and by judging for ourselves. And believe me, I know how this can be a messy and frustrating process. My husband and I are on the receiving end of plenty of questioning and criticism from our media and our fellow citizens, and it’s not always easy, but we wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world. Because time and again, we have seen that countries are stronger and more prosperous when the voices and opinions of all citizens can be heard.”

FLOTUS in China

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thepoliticalnotebook:

The New York Times story by Carlotta Gall on what Pakistan knew about bin Laden was censored in Pakistan’s edition, leaving a huge chunk of blank space on the front page.
[Via BBC correspondent Aleem Maqbool]

thepoliticalnotebook:

The New York Times story by Carlotta Gall on what Pakistan knew about bin Laden was censored in Pakistan’s edition, leaving a huge chunk of blank space on the front page.

[Via BBC correspondent Aleem Maqbool]

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azmatzahra:

When the Egyptian revolution broke out in 2011, millions around the world turned to Al Jazeera for its reporters’ smart, in-depth, around-the-clock coverage. Three years later, not one single Al Jazeera journalist is reporting on the ground in Egypt. Instead, four of the media network’s journalists are being detained by Egyptian authorities. The mounting worldwide campaign for their release is based on a simple message: Journalism isn’t a crime. Along with thousands of others, we’re asking Egypt not to suppress freedom of the press. Will you do the same? #FreeAJStaff

azmatzahra:

When the Egyptian revolution broke out in 2011, millions around the world turned to Al Jazeera for its reporters’ smart, in-depth, around-the-clock coverage. Three years later, not one single Al Jazeera journalist is reporting on the ground in Egypt. Instead, four of the media network’s journalists are being detained by Egyptian authorities. The mounting worldwide campaign for their release is based on a simple message: Journalism isn’t a crime. Along with thousands of others, we’re asking Egypt not to suppress freedom of the press. Will you do the same? #FreeAJStaff

(via thepoliticalnotebook)

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takepart:

Your rug may really tie the room together, but do you know who’s responsible for weaving it?

takepart:

Your rug may really tie the room together, but do you know who’s responsible for weaving it?

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poynterinstitute:

Check out Rick Edmonds’ post about how newspaper stocks did last year.

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pulitzercenter:

From the Caribbean to Africa, the production of cocoa has long been a bittersweet tale of profit and power. Ethnic strife in Ivory Coast is the most recent chapter in this prized commodity’s checkered history. Initially migrant workers from across West Africa were invited to the country to share in its farmland, helping Ivory Coast become the world’s top producer. (Today it provides some 40 percent of the world’s crop.) But once the economy went sour in the 1980s, cocoa profits were more jealously guarded. Land disputes erupted, sparking xenophobic violence that became a 10-year civil war.

With the cessation of post-election violence last year and the ascendance of a new government, the war is supposedly over. But new attacks are still carried out between rival factions; thousands of people still live in refugee camps; and those who return to their destroyed homes swear vengeance. As always, cocoa production continues through the strife — but reconciliation and a true end to conflict may still be a long way off.

Read more from Pulitzer Center grantees Peter DiCampo and Austin Merrill about migrant workers, cocoa production and the Ivory Coast. 

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humansofnewyork:

"I can’t stand moral absolutism. You know, there’s always that guy who wants to point out that Martin Luther King cheated on his wife— as if he obviously couldn’t have been a great person if he did something like that. Or someone will bring out an inspirational quote, and get you to agree, and then inform you that Hitler said it. As if a good thought couldn’t come from Hitler. Moral absolutism keeps us from learning from the past. It’s easy to say: ‘Hitler was a demon. Nazis were all bad seeds.’ That’s simple. It’s much harder to say: ‘Is that humanity? Is that me?’"

humansofnewyork:

"I can’t stand moral absolutism. You know, there’s always that guy who wants to point out that Martin Luther King cheated on his wife— as if he obviously couldn’t have been a great person if he did something like that. Or someone will bring out an inspirational quote, and get you to agree, and then inform you that Hitler said it. As if a good thought couldn’t come from Hitler. Moral absolutism keeps us from learning from the past. It’s easy to say: ‘Hitler was a demon. Nazis were all bad seeds.’ That’s simple. It’s much harder to say: ‘Is that humanity? Is that me?’"